Page 21 - Photography



RGC's Online Photo Exhibitions

Roger has launched three online photo exhibitions so far. They show documentary pictures and you can find them by typing ROGER GEORGE CLARK PHOTO ALBUM  into your search engine, or clicking on the link at the bottom of this page. The exhibitions show:-

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      BBC Radio London Revealed - Over 700 Photos

BBC Radio London was the UK capital's first modern local radio station. It opened in 1970 and stayed on the air until 1988. But what went on behind the scenes?

These photographs - over 700 - will show you. Here you can see a lost world - the world of pre-digital radio.

There were no computers, mobile phones, CDs, or iPods. Nobody had heard of the Internet.

Disc jockeys played LPs and EPs (left). Journalists pounded away on manual typewriters.

Reel-to-reel recordings were edited with razor blades and sticky tape.


Radio London was the BBC in miniature - with a dash of anarchy thrown in. Pop stars, politicians, actors, writers, sportsmen, artists, gardeners, James Bond, and even a Nazi war criminal appeared on BBC Radio London.

Hundreds of broadcasters started their careers here. Some went onto fame and fortune. Others faded, or vanished. One became a government minister. Two became millionaires. Another committed suicide.

The Radio London pictures are arranged in three parts. Parts 1 and 2 show what went on behind the scenes, and how programmes were made and got on the air. Part 3 shows portraits.

To find out what happened behind the microphone click on the link at the bottom of this page. And discover the faces behind the voices that filled the London airwaves for 18 years.


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Walking Around Venice

These pictures show Venice at a particular moment - September 1972. Flares and long hair were all the rage and hippies (escapees from the Vietnam War?) stalked round the city.

I had bought a first edition of the 1966 guidebook Venice for Pleasure by J.G. Links. This has since become a classic and is still in print. To my surprise I found you could walk around Venice. Links took you off the normal tourist routes to parts of the city visitors seldom reached - what the painter Whistler called the 'Venice in Venice.' Here you could find deserted squares and canals, children playing in ancient buildings, slum-dwellers, and boys sitting on windowsills because so little light filtered down to their homes. Henry James travelled in a gondola.


Links stayed at the Danieli. I stayed in one-star hotal and walked. These pictures are the result - one man walking through Venice capturing life on the wing.

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                                  I Was A Teenage Photographer

This is where it all started - Emanuel school in south London. My photographic life - and all that flowed from it - began here.
While a teenager I borrowed a box-camera from my aunt and went down to Putney to photograph the start of the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race. I took only 8 pictures, all of them unsharp.

Nonetheless, I was hooked. Photography intrigued me. I borrowed books from the local library and bought an occasional photo magazine. Although there was a photographic society at school I was never a member. I was a loner and self-taught. Over the next three years I experimented with a couple of box-cameras. Again hazy images. I still needed a better camera. I found one in a sale at Boots the chemists - a  folding  Kodak  - cost 5. In my last few weeks at school I bought a second-hand Leica from a friend. With these two cameras I set about photographing  some of the outdoor activities at school, including life in our army cadet camp (left).



When people look back at the 1960s they think about the Beatles, Rolling Stones, David Bailey - sex, drugs, rock 'n' roll - the Mini Minor, mini skirts, maxi scandals and satire. For some the '60s were a time of excitement and liberation. But for most of us the '60s never happened. We inhabited a different world - school, holidays in Brighton and Bournemouth, and endless boredom. All you had to look forward to was a dreary job and endless work until you retired. Surely, I thought, there were better ways to live? Photography provided the answer. This was my means of escape. These teenage images show how I started the long haul upwards.


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To view my three exhibitions - BBC Radio London Revealed, Walking Around Venice and I was a Teenage Photographer - visit my online exhibition site - ROGER GEORGE CLARK PHOTO ALBUM. Or click on the link below:-

                     http://spaces.msn.com/members/CLARKPHOTOS/